Did I Run Away?

It is always a sobering time when Lent arrives each year. A time of preparation, denial and discipline as we are getting ready to recall Jesus’ time of great trial and sacrifice. A time of mixed emotions as well since the resurrection on Easter Sunday marks His triumph over evil and death as well as our salvation. The greatest day on our Christian calendar!

Speaking of mixed emotions, when I watched Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ, I was surprised at my emotional reaction to Peter’s realization that he had just denied Christ three times. I felt so bad for Peter! He was on his knees sobbing before the Blessed Mother before he ran off at the horror of what he himself had done. That caused a lot of soul searching for myself! But, then, isn’t that what Lent is all about?

Below is an article that appeared in Word Among Us ( a favorite publication of mine) last week for your contemplation. I wish you all the blessings of Easter!

Behold the Man

A new look at Jesus’ crucifixion.

Jesus Crucified

Imagine that you have traveled back to the year AD 63 and are sitting with the apostle John, who is telling you what it was like to be on Calvary as Jesus gave his life for us on the cross.

“When Jesus was arrested after our Passover meal, most of us ran away. It was probably the darkest moment of my life. Jesus had just shown us at the meal how much he was willing to give for us, and I couldn’t stay with him in his moment of need. He had sacrificed three years teaching us, encouraging us, loving us, and healing us—and I couldn’t risk sacrificing anything for him.

“When I realized what I had done, I knew I couldn’t stay in hiding. I asked God to forgive me for running away, and I began searching high and low for Jesus. When I finally caught up with him, he was being led to Calvary.

Father, Forgive Them

“I pushed through the crowd just in time to see the soldiers driving the spikes into Jesus’ hands. And amidst the noise of the crowds, the pounding of the hammers, and Jesus’ own cries of pain, I heard him say, ‘Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing’ (Luke 23:34). When I first heard this, I wondered whom he was praying for. Was it the Jewish rulers who had condemned him? Was it Pontius Pilate and the Roman soldiers who had flogged him, beaten him, and crucified him? Or maybe it was us, who had been with him so long and yet abandoned him at the very end?

“But over the years as I’ve prayed and talked about this with the other apostles, I realized that Jesus was doing exactly what he had taught us to do. For as long as we were with him, he kept telling us that we had to forgive seventy times seven times (Matthew 18:22). Now here he was, being just as free with his mercy as he always told us to be.

Free to Forgive

“As we reflect on this beautiful act of Jesus on Good Friday, we see just how far God’s forgiveness reached. Peter knew that he was forgiven for having denied Jesus. Thomas knew he was forgiven for his lack of faith. We were all forgiven for having run away. Now we know that no one is beyond God’s mercy. Jesus proved it when he forgave the soldiers who mocked him, the chief priests who condemned him, and even Judas, who betrayed him.

“Hearing Jesus speak words of forgiveness even as nails were being driven into him, even as he was being hung on the cross, even as he had to gasp for every breath, we all need to ask whether we are willing to forgive just as fully. And today, I’d like to ask you: Is there any way you need to follow Jesus’ example and forgive? Are there people whose forgiveness you need to seek? Don’t hold back. Remember Jesus and all he gave up for you. Then ask his Spirit to help you be just as generous.

Jesus, Remember Me 

“A little bit later, something very moving happened to one of the thieves who was crucified next to Jesus. It seemed as if Jesus’ love and humility—and the way in which he embraced such an unjust death—changed this man. He defended Jesus when the other thief started insulting him. Then he turned and said, ‘Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.’ And again, in the midst of his agony, Jesus reached out in love and mercy. ‘Today,’ he told the man, ‘you will be with me in Paradise’ (Luke 23:42-43).

“It’s amazing that Jesus would welcome this sinner into his kingdom with just as much assurance as he welcomed Peter, James, and the rest of the apostles—men who had given up so much to follow him. But this thief has become a reminder to me that anyone who turns to Jesus will be received into heaven.

“Again, the depth of his mercy and love is overwhelming. And again, consider: Is there someone whom you have given up on? Is there someone whom you think will never be welcomed into heaven? Don’t judge! Don’t condemn! Don’t forget that you are just as unworthy as he was. Don’t forget that you needed salvation through the cross just as much as this thief did. Jesus didn’t condemn this man. He didn’t condemn his disciples, even though they had deserted him. He won’t turn anyone away, and he asks us to be just as open and merciful—even to our enemies.

Why Have You Forsaken Me?

“Jesus’ words just before he died were probably confusing to the apostles: ‘My God, my God,’ he cried out, ‘why have you forsaken me?’ (Mark 15:34). It’s hard to believe that Jesus, who was always close to the Father, could be abandoned by his Father at his moment of greatest suffering and need. Would God really turn away from him just as his Son was performing the greatest act of obedience the world would ever know?

“However, Jesus felt separated from his Father because he was carrying our sins. He was speaking both from the crushing pain of his crucifixion and from the relentless spiritual attacks he was enduring. This was Satan’s pivotal moment. If there was any chance of getting Jesus to deny his Father and turn away from his commitment to us, it was now. The spiritual assault he was enduring was so violent that it must have felt as if he were separated from his Father. At the same time, he must have known in his heart that God would never abandon him. This cry that issued from his bloodied lips and his parched mouth was both an acknowledgment of the battle he was fighting and an affirmation that even if it felt as if God had left him, he would not abandon God.”

Just as Jesus felt forsaken and abandoned by God on the cross, the same can happen to us. St. John must have felt that way at times, especially when he and Peter and James were arrested, or when they were beaten or mocked for telling people about Jesus. At these times they held onto trust in God and confidence that Jesus was with them, even if it felt as if he’d abandoned them. Are there times when you feel alone and forsaken? Are you wondering whether God has left you in a situation of confusion, struggle, or pain? He hasn’t. Remember the psalm: “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted” (Psalm 34:18). He is always with you!

Behold the Man

So many other things happened that day. Jesus said and did so much, even as he hung in agony and his life’s blood slowly left his body. There’s so much more you can receive and experience as you ponder Jesus’ death. As you read the passion stories, take Pilate’s advice and “behold the man” (John 19:5). Behold the man, wounded and bruised, crowned with thorns. Behold the man, who was despised and rejected. Behold the man of sorrow, acquainted with grief.

But behold also the man who loved you so much that he gave up everything for you. Behold the man who endured the nails, the whip, the thorns, and the cross for you. Behold the man who endured the weight of sin, the onslaught of the devil, and the loneliness of desertion for you. Behold him and bow down in worship and love. Behold him and give him your life. Behold him and know that he has won for you a place in heaven.

When Peter, James, and the rest saw Jesus on Easter Sunday, they beheld Jesus again—this time as a glorified man—and their hearts were filled with joy. This Lent, behold the glorified Jesus. Fix your heart on him as he is seated in heaven, pouring out grace upon grace into your heart. Behold him every time you celebrate Mass and recall the love he poured out at the Last Supper. Behold him in your family and neighbors and love and serve them just as he has loved and served you. Finally, behold him in the poor and suffering and imitate him by washing their feet. May God bless you.

#Easter

@StPeterDanb

Lectio Divina-Like Rain That Waters The Earth

A Spring Rain

Isaiah is consistently beautiful in his writings whether it be in the Advent/Christmas seasons, or Lent/Easter times. I always love them. The Mass reading this past Tuesday, Is 55:10-11, captures a beautiful reality.

My daily prayer life involves Lectio Divina which is a practice of reading the daily scripture readings and then pondering and being open to listening for what God wants to impart to you. A passage like this is ideal. The meditation for this day (Feb 23) from Word Among Us gives an excellent description of Lectio Divina and commentary on Isaiah’s passage.

Just as from the heavens

the rain and snow come

And do not return there

till they have watered the earth

making it fertile and fruitful,…

So shall my word be

that goes forth from my mouth;

It shall not return to me void,

but shall do my will,..

DAILY MEDITATION: ISAIAH 55:10-11

My word . . . shall not return to me void. (Isaiah 55:11)

Have you ever been inside a greenhouse? Its transparent walls trap heat and humidity, creating a tropical atmosphere—even in the wintertime. The walls also keep out hungry herbivores. It’s no wonder a greenhouse is such a fertile environment!

This may be a good metaphor for the practice of lectio divina, an ancient, prayerful way of reading Scripture. In today’s first reading, we hear about the life-giving power of God’s word. It’s like rain that waters the earth and causes crops to grow and bear fruit. You could say that lectio divina is an especially fertile environment for growth. 

In order to experience God’s written word through lectio divina, you need to “wall yourself off” from distractions for a time. This creates space for the four traditional stages of this practice: reading, meditation, prayer, and contemplation. 

Reading. Just as fertile soil helps plants grow, the words of Scripture are a rich medium in which we can experience God’s grace. So unhurried reading of a short passage is the first step of lectio divina. This stage usually ends as you pause at a phrase—even a word—that catches your attention.

Meditation. Remember the greenhouse’s clear walls that let in so much light? Similarly, you can invite the Holy Spirit to illuminate the truths in that phrase or word as you ponder it and turn it over in your mind.

Prayer. Next, bring your reflections before the Lord in the form of a prayerful conversation. Maybe you could thank him for a truth he has revealed. Or ask him whatever questions come into your heart. Then give him room to respond. At this point, the Lord may already be irrigating your soul with peace or joy.

Contemplation. Now be still and open. Allow anything God has said or done to soak in. Let his word take root within you—even if you don’t immediately “feel” anything happening.

And that’s it. But don’t be fooled. Even though it’s structured and simple, lectio divina contains living surprises, like any good greenhouse. You never know at which stage you may encounter the Lord walking through the garden.

“Lord, make your word come alive in my heart!”

Psalm 34:4-7, 16-19
Matthew 6:7-15

@stpeterdanb1 @Lent

Rouse One Another to Love

The most powerful part of the Mass is centered on receiving the Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist. In addition to that transforming experience, there are other beautiful things that occur during Mass. Shortly after the Mass begins, we all recite the Confiteor together “I confess to Almighty God, and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned….” And, at the end, “…therefore, I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin, all the angels and saints, and you, my brothers and sisters, to pray for me…” So, right from the beginning of Mass, we acknowledge who we are to each other and ask for help from each other. You can feel the love for each other knowing who we are….disciples of Jesus Christ. The Liturgy of the Eucharist begins and after the Consecration of the bread and wine we say the Lord’s Prayer and then turn to all those around us and give a Sign of Peace to each other. More love. Two more short powerful prayers from Scripture and then we receive Communion together. As St. Ignatius of Loyola said that if you don’t get emotional at some point in the Mass, it was no a good Mass. That should be your experience.

So, one morning in January during prayer time when I was going through the Daily Readings, I was struck by the words in Heb 24-25: “We must consider how to rouse one another to love and good works. We should not stay away from our assembly, as is the custom of some, but encourage one another,…” I knew what this was all about. Why we need to be physically together to live our faith. God sent His only Son Jesus to be with us physically and Jesus instituted the Sacraments to be outward physical signs of grace for us.

The meditation from Word Among Us for that day is below and describes best the ways we can rouse one another.

 DAILY MEDITATION: HEBREWS 10:19-25

We must consider how to rouse one another to love and good works. (Hebrews 10:24)

How simple the gospel message is! Through his cross and resurrection, Jesus has opened up a way for each of us to be set free from sin and enter into the presence of God. Jesus is risen, and the door to heaven is now wide open. But as simple and straightforward as this message is, we sometimes need help seeing the open door that’s right in front of us. And that’s where brothers and sisters in Christ come in.

Sometimes they remind us that the sacraments are powerful and readily available. They might say, “You seem pretty burdened. Have you thought about going to Confession? The parish down the road has confessions every Saturday.” Or “I’m going to an online Mass at the end of my shift today. How about joining me from your computer?” Or “I wonder if your dad might be open to receiving the Anointing of the Sick?”

Sometimes they point out opportunities we might have overlooked. They might tell us about a homeless center whose food pantry is running low. They might invite us to a virtual parish Bible study we have been meaning to check out. Or they might urge us to write to our representative about an important issue.

Sometimes they help us see where the Holy Spirit is already at work in our lives. “What a great idea!” a friend might say. “That sounds inspired. How can I help you make it work?” Or “You always seem to have a bigger perspective than I do. I really appreciate the way you help expand my vision.” Or “You’re so good at getting to the heart of a complex situation. Don’t be afraid to say it the way you see it.”

Sometimes they exhort us to trust God and to believe when our faith is wavering. At other times, our faith helps them persevere through a challenging time.

In all these ways and many more, we can “rouse one another” to a deeper surrender to the Lord!

“Lord, help us to give and receive the encouragement that will make us faithful stewards of your gifts.”

Psalm 24:1-6
Mark 4:21-25

@LoveOneAnother

Feeling Unworthy to Be Part of God’s Plan? – You’re Right, You Are!

I have always enjoyed reading the Scriptures during the Advent season as they are so uplifting and a delight to the soul. Last week in one of the daily readings was the genealogy of Jesus in Mt 1: 1-17. It is one of those readings which is a bit long and has a lot of information but seems pretty boring. Boring if you don’t know the back story behind it all. Once you find that out, a whole new perspective comes into view! Which is why it is so important read the Scriptures and other religious writings outside of what you see and hear at Sunday Mass once a week. There are a wealth of resources in our Church of 2,000 years including the Word Among Us publication, the National Catholic Register newspaper and the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN) just to name a few.

Getting back to the genealogy of Jesus, one discovers a big mix of bad apples in the family tree! For example, Jacob, a deceiver and thief; Rahab, a prostitute; King David, a murderer and adulterer; King Manasseh, an idolater and King Ahaz who did everything God had told him not to do!

So, what does this have to do with the title of this blog post (which is a bit edgy)? The inspiration comes from the meditation in Word Among Us for December 17th which is included below.

DAILY MEDITATION: MATTHEW 1:1-17

The genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. (Matthew 1:1)

A family of liars, adulterers, murderers, fornicators, connivers, and blasphemers. What a miserable lot! And yet the most famous member of this family tree isn’t known for some gross sin or heinous crime. Quite the opposite, in fact. He is God become man, Jesus Christ, our Savior.

Why do you think God chose such a rogues’ gallery of ancestors for his Son? Is this the best he could come up with? Well, in a sense, yes! No matter how good any family may look on paper, they are still fallen, imperfect human beings. 

Centuries of biblical history have shown us that God doesn’t usually choose the bravest or the strongest or even the holiest people to fulfill his plan. He chooses ordinary, sinful people. And so Jesus was born into an imperfect line—but a line that was made holy by God’s grace. That wasn’t a problem for God though. He can work with anything. In fact, it delights him to fill us, cracked and leaky vessels though we are, with his love.

Do you feel unworthy of being part of God’s plan? You’re right, you are! We all are. But however spotty our personal history or family tree may be, it doesn’t keep the Lord from offering us a new identity as his sons and daughters. All who are baptized into Christ are grafted into a spotless lineage and given the grace to grow into their new inheritance.

God redeemed a line of misfits and miscreants with his power. And he used this family as an important part of his plan. He is ready to do the same for you. You are more than able to bring Christ into the world, just as David, Solomon, Moses, and all the others did.

So come to the Lord and ask him to show you his plans for you. Does he want you to bring Christ to someone in your life? Will you let him renew your zeal for sharing the good news? Always remember that you are part of a royal line, and nothing is impossible for God!

“Father, help me to take up my role in your plan. Unworthy though I am, let me be your light to the world!”

Genesis 49:2, 8-10
Psalm 72:1-4, 7-8, 17

@StPeterdanb #StPeterdanb #Christmas #Advent

See What Awaits You.

The new liturgical year begins with the first Sunday of Advent which was November 29th this year. Advent is always one of my favorite times of the year as it is the time to prepare for the birth of the Christ Child at Christmas which begins the Christmas season. The joy and anticipation is readily apparent in the daily Mass readings and the passages from Isaiah and others are especially beautiful. Now is a perfect time to begin a new season for your heart and soul after a very stressful and difficult year.

If you have been away from Mass and Reconciliation, you can return now. Or spend some time in Adoration. Many churches are still having Lessons & Carols in-person (with the usual health precautions) and online. Perhaps creating a new daily prayer habit. Start slow with 15 minutes a day with our Lord, or reading scripture. If something strikes your interest, follow that lead.

The Word Among Us (WAU) is an excellent publication of the daily Mass readings, meditations and spiritual resources. The beautiful meditation today tied the three readings together and follows below:

DAILY MEDITATION: PSALM 23:1-6

I shall live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life. (Psalm Response)

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” This popular song shows just how much we associate the holidays with the comforts of home. Even if we can’t be home this Christmas, we probably recall times of anticipation from the past—of stringing lights, wrapping presents, decorating the tree, and gathering around the table. But have you ever thought about how Advent is also a time to anticipate how wonderful it will be to gather in God’s eternal home?

Many of the readings we hear during the Advent season focus on just this theme. Why? Because just as we look forward to Jesus’ coming at Christmas, so the Church invites us to reflect on the day when the Lord will come again in glory and welcome us into heaven. Let’s see how today’s first reading stirs this longing. 

Like any good host, Jesus is eager to welcome his guests and feed them. Isaiah envisions a great feast “for all peoples” (25:6). Everything we could possibly desire—Isaiah uses the image of “rich food and choice wines” (25:6)—will be ours because we will be face-to-face with what we have always desired the most, God himself.

On that day, all the guests will gather as one family around this table because God will have removed the “web that is woven over all nations” (Isaiah 25:7). Just imagine—all the strife, conflict, and arguments that we witness today, even in our own families, will no longer exist. 

There will be great rejoicing in heaven. God will “wipe away the tears from all faces” and “destroy death forever” (Isaiah 25:8). The disappointments, losses, and pain we have experienced during our lives on earth—all will be healed. Reunited with our loved ones, we will never have to fear being separated from them again.

Who wouldn’t want to be welcomed into this kind of home? This is what awaits you as you prepare to live in the house of Christ, your Lord. So rejoice! This Advent, as you prepare your home for Christmas, remember that Jesus Christ, the Messiah, is preparing a place in his home for you. 

“Heavenly Father, thank you for inviting me into your home.” 

Isaiah 25:6-10
Matthew 15:29-37

@Advent

@Stpeterdanb1

The Joy of Discovering New Polyphony

I have always been very taken with music as part of the liturgy. I grew up in Queens, NY and attended Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church and school. Vatican II came along when I was in eighth grade so I was very familiar with the Latin Mass and the many beautiful Latin hymns. I always enjoyed singing at Mass and greatly appreciate what music and singing bring to the Liturgy in creating that sacred space for worship. Later in life, I rediscovered Gregorian Chant and Polyphony both of which are a feast for the ears! This music will quickly take you to the ethereal realms.

This music brings an special awareness to the transcendent during Mass. The sound and sight of a choir of men and women from all backgrounds singing in harmony to God is a vocal manifestation of Jesus’ prayer to the Father that we all be one (John 17:21so that they may all be one, as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us..).

I was browsing for some chant music recently when a picture of Josquin Des Prez wearing a red hat caught my eye. I had not heard of him before so I began looking at videos of his music and came across the group The Brookline Consort.

I played the YouTube video of their performance of his Ave Maria – virgo serena on Catholic TV. I am at a loss for words but I can only say that their singing was so beautiful that it hurt! The prayer itself is very moving and is below in both Latin and English. The video is at the end.

I never thought that I would write something about music but sometimes things happen and I’m glad that they did. I hope you enjoy this piece as much as I do. Or, maybe it will open up a new interest in liturgical music for you. The peace of Christ to you!

@liturgicalpolyphony @liturgicalmusic @catholicmass @gregorianchant @avemaria @blessedmother @liturgicalchant

RCIA Inquiry

Are you an adult (18+) Catholic who has not received the Sacraments of Eucharist and/or Confirmation?

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) is the normative way in which non-Catholics – those unbaptized as well as those baptized into other Christian denominations – enter the Church.  It is also the way baptized Catholics who never received any catechesis and did not receive Eucharist and Confirmation, can complete their Sacrament of Initiation.  The Inquiry Period is October 1, 8 and 15 when we will have weekly Thursday evening sessions for those who want to explore the process.  To express interest or to learn more, please call the rectory office of St Peter Church, Danbury, CT at 203-743-2707.  If you are not in the area, you can also contact CatholicsComeHome.org for information as well.

@StPeterdanbury1 @CatholicsComeHome

Everyone Can Be in His Family

Today’s readings are very cohesive in their message. Many times over the centuries, and in modern times as well, faith has been manipulated as a tool to divide people for political ends. This has never been the message of Jesus. The Daily Meditation by Word Among Us is a fitting description of God’s teaching spanning both the Old and New Testaments.

DAILY MEDITATION: ISAIAH 56:1, 6-7

My house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples. (Isaiah 56:7)

All of today’s readings tell us that God’s salvation is meant for everyone. The prophet Isaiah speaks of foreigners who will join themselves to the Lord (56:6). The psalmist declares, “May the peoples praise you, O God” (Psalm 67:6). Jesus praises a Canaanite woman’s faith (Matthew 15:28). And Paul, apostle to the Gentiles, proclaims that God wants to “have mercy upon all” (Romans 11:32). 

For the Jewish people in today’s first reading, this must have been difficult to accept. They had just returned from exile to discover foreigners living in their holy city, Jerusalem. Their covenant told them that they were set apart as a holy people chosen by God. So how could “impure” Gentiles be living on their land? They forgot that God had chosen them by his grace, not just for their own sake, but to bring his light to every nation. 

This call became increasingly clear in the early Church. Initially, all of Jesus’ followers were Jewish. But as Gentiles came to believe in the Lord, the Jewish Christians began to understand that God’s plan of salvation was far bigger than they had expected. Learning to live and work and pray alongside Gentiles could not have been easy. But they, like us, had to allow God’s grace to help them love each other. The result? The diverse, beautiful, sometimes messy Church we know today. 

Jesus wants his Church to be a house of prayer for all nations so that every person can belong to his family. He sees people who are searching for hope, meaning, and a place to meet God, and he is asking us to draw them in, to be the loving, welcoming face of the Church. May we always be open to everyone who is seeking the Lord, and through us, may God’s grace flow out to the entire world!

“Jesus, help me to show everyone the love that you have given me.” 

Psalm 67:2-3, 5-6, 8
Romans 11:13-15, 29-32
Matthew 15:21-28

@StPeterDanbury1

@CatholicRites