Loving and Serving People-The Only Real Path to Contentment

Several of the daily Mass readings recently were from 1Timothy which have always had much meaning for me. The publication Word Among Us had an excellent piece on 1Tm 6: 2c-12 recently and is presented here.

Catholic Meditations 

Meditation: 1 Timothy 6:2-12 

Religion with contentment is a great gain. (1 Timothy 6:6) 

Are you content? It’s a surprisingly complicated question. We love Jesus, but sometimes we feel unfulfilled. We have heard, “The love of money is the root of all evils,” but it isn’t always about money (1 Timothy 6:10). Sure, material things like our possessions, food, or recreation can compete for our love. But the desire for recognition, status, or fame can also make us feel dissatisfied. 

What are you longing for? Each of us probably has something that feels just out of reach, and we think that if we had it, we would finally be happy. For some, it’s money or material possessions. For others, it’s recognition, popularity, or respect. Whatever it is for you, know that if it becomes a focal point, it can ensnare you. You can become envious of those who have what you want. Still yearning for something more, you can stray from the foundation of your faith and mistakenly think that you need Jesus and something else. 

Banish this fiction from your mind! All you really need is Jesus. He alone can give you true and lasting contentment. As you learn how to place everything else in its proper context, you will find yourself receiving more from Jesus. 

The best way to find this kind of contentment is to bring your attachments to the Lord and ask him to set you free. Remember, you didn’t bring anything into this world, and you won’t take anything out of it. The only thing that will stand the test of time is knowing Christ and knowing that you have loved and served his people. If you dedicate yourself to advancing these goals, not only will you please the Lord, but you’ll also become more and more content. 

Jesus doesn’t condemn anyone for having riches, for taking pride in their accomplishments, or for enjoying their possessions. But he does warn people who find their security in these things more than in him. He wants all of us to set our hearts on things above, not on earthly matters. This is the best way to keep our possessions and our reputations in the right perspective. It’s also a great way to build the kingdom. 

“Lord, help me to overcome the attachments that keep me from you. Jesus, I want to find the contentment of knowing you!” 

Psalm 49:6-10, 17-20 

Luke 8:1 

#FaithAlive

Morning of Reflection – St Peter Church Danbury CT

Religion and Ritual

Religion and Ritual is the Sept. topic. Today we often hear the statement, “I’m spiritual but not religious.” Yet from the beginning of humankind peoples were religious and created rituals to honor or supplicate their gods. We will look at this reality and examine the role of religion for us. Join Yvette Lessard in the Parish hall of St Peter Church on Main St. in Danbury CT, Thurs. Sept. 12 from 10-11:45 AM

#Spiritual

#LivingOurFaith

And The Rich Man Turned Away Sad

It has been a busy but good summer that has slowed down my posting. Most recently spending four days with my two sisters and their families and my mother in Colorado. A time that really rejuvenates the soul.

Now that I am back, there have been several good Daily readings in August. One of them was the story about the rich man who asked Jesus several questions about what he should do to gain eternal life. We usually focus on how he was saddened by Jesus’ final response and went away sad. We do not hear about him again but was that really the end of his story? Here was a man who realized that he needed to grow and that is why he approached Jesus. Isn’t this what we should be doing as followers of Jesus i.e to ask questions of ourselves and seek asnwers from God? The meditation by Word Among Us on this reading was excellent and is included below.

Meditation: Matthew 19:16-22 

What do I still lack? (Matthew 19:20) 

When we read this story of the rich young man, we often focus on how he “went away sad” (Matthew 19:22). But we don’t always give him enough credit. He knew enough to realize he needed help—and to ask Jesus for it. His question was sincere too: “Teacher, what good must I do?” He wanted to be a better man, and he wanted the “eternal life” that he saw the disciples enjoying (19:16). 

This is a good question for us to ask Jesus every day as well. In fact, the Church encourages us to do it. Every day, we can ask Jesus to help us see how we are doing in our walk with him and how we can do better. In the sixteenth century, St. Ignatius of Loyola developed a way for us to do just that. He called it the “Daily Examen.” Here’s a version that consists of five steps. 

The first step is to thank God for all the blessings you’ve received that day. What are you thankful for? 

The second step is to pray to the Holy Spirit. It can be hard to recognize God’s presence in the course of the day. So ask him to help you look back with spiritual hindsight to see where he was with you that day. 

Third, review what happened today. Whom did you encounter? What situations and emotions arose? How was God speaking to you through them? And how did you respond? Don’t worry about every circumstance; just look at what stands out. 

Fourth, think about when you felt closest to God. Perhaps it was as someone helped you in the grocery store or as you admired a beautiful sunset. When did you feel further away from God? Maybe you felt impatient when someone asked you for help. Perhaps someone cut you off in traffic, and you got angry. Be sure to ask the Lord’s forgiveness for any sins and for his help to change. But remember, don’t go away sad! Jesus is inviting you to follow him on the path to heaven. 

Your fifth and final step is to look ahead to the next day. Think about the people you’ll meet, the situations you’ll face, and invite Jesus to be part of them. Remember, he wants to walk with you every step of the way. 

“Lord, open my eyes! Help me to become more like you.” 

Judges 2:11-19 

Psalm 106:34-37, 39-40, 43-44 

#IgnatianSpirituality

Malta House

Helping Homeless, Pregnant Moms

Malta House promotes the dignity of God-given life by providing a nurturing home environment, support services and independent living skills to pregnant and parenting mother of all faiths and their children. This is possible through the generosity of many. Representatives came to St Peter Church last Sunday to share their mission and needs and to say thank you for helping to provide a safe home for mothers and their babies. Please visit their website at http://www.maltahouse.org to see how you can be involved.

#MaltaHouse

#SupportingSingleMothers